A-rubber

About

The construction industry is a major contributor to global carbon emissions, meaning the potential for positive impact within the sector is equally great.

According to UN-Habitat and World Bank figures, by 2030 three billion people will need new housing and basic infrastructure.  Alongside the huge demand for construction this represents, we are at a point of unprecedented awareness of the depletion of resources used for building, and of the impact the built environment has on the health of people, communities, and the planet.

Now is our chance to take decisive action, by developing patterns of designing and building to improve quality of life for people around the world, and by learning from and advancing the local knowledge and traditional methods that have been adapted to climate and context over generations.

To find out more about INTBAU you can visit our website.  You can also register to be part of the Architecture Challenge, and to be sent more details about our interactive online programme.

A-rubber

About

The construction industry is a major contributor to global carbon emissions, meaning the potential for positive impact within the sector is equally great.

According to UN-Habitat and World Bank figures, by 2030 three billion people will need new housing and basic infrastructure. Alongside the huge demand for construction this represents, we are at a point of unprecedented awareness of the depletion of resources used for building, and of the impact the built environment has on the health of people, communities, and the planet.

Now is our chance to take decisive action, by developing patterns of designing and building to improve quality of life for people around the world, and by learning from and advancing the local knowledge and traditional methods that have been adapted to climate and context over generations.

To find out more about INTBAU you can visit our website. You can also register to be part of the Architecture Challenge, and to be sent more details about our interactive online programme.

A-earth

The Challenge

INTBAU is organising the Architecture Challenge as a competition for low-carbon, no-carbon, and carbon-negative designs for resilient and adaptable houses.

We want students, teachers, architects, designers, engineers, and anyone with an interest in buildings and building to take on The Challenge by registering below. You can get involved by joining the interactive online learning series, and by taking part in the design competition.

The learning series is free and open to everyone and will begin on 30 July with a webinar on architecture’s responsibility and opportunity better to serve people and the planet.

Full details of the learning series are in the Programme.

A-earth

The Challenge

INTBAU is organising the Architecture Challenge as a competition for low-carbon, no-carbon, and carbon-negative designs for resilient and adaptable houses.

We want students, teachers, architects, designers, engineers, and anyone with an interest in buildings and building to take on The Challenge by registering. You can get involved by joining the interactive online learning series, and by taking part in the design competition.

The learning series is free and open to everyone and will begin on 30 July with a webinar on architecture’s responsibility and opportunity better to serve people and the planet.

Full details of the learning series are in the Programme.

A-stone

Programme

The Challenge will launch with an online programme of webinars, interviews, Q&A sessions, and spotlighted case studies from around the world.

Sessions in the online programme will be held live each month from July until April, and will be free and open to everyone. Certificates will be awarded to those who take part in at least four sessions in the online programme.

Session 1 (Launch): Architecture’s Responsibility and Opportunity

Date: Friday 30 July

Time: 15:00 BST

This session will set the scene, demonstrating the scope of the challenge considering up to 40% of global carbon emissions are directly and indirectly influenced by built environment sectors and the opportunity this represents for those designing and building to be part of the solution to the climate crisis – providing better homes, shelters, houses, and housing in the process.

Register for the launch ⇒

 

Speakers:

Elsie Owusu

Elsie Owusu OBE is a leading British architect based in London. She was the first chair of the Society of Black Architects and has been a council member of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) since 2014. Her extensive portfolio includes co-leading the refurbishment of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom in 2009 and Green Park tube station. Having campaigned for equality and inclusion in architecture for many years, Owusu set up Architecture: Incubator initiative, to boost the numbers of diversity practices in the profession.

Eric J. Cesal

Eric J. Cesal is a designer, educator, writer, and noted post-disaster expert, having led on-the-ground reconstruction programs after the Haiti earthquake, the Great East Japan Tsunami, and Superstorm Sandy. Cesal’s formal training is as an architect, with international development, economics and foreign policy among his areas of expertise. Cesal serves as the Special Projects Director for the Curry Stone Foundation, a U.S. non-profit which seeks to support and empower community-driven social impact design and as host of Social Design Insights, a podcast with the leading voices of the public interest design movement. He also serves as the Director of Sustainable Environmental Design at the College of Design at UC Berkeley.

Mina Hasman

Mina Hasman leads Skidmore Owings and Merrill LLP’s sustainability and wellbeing daily operations and long-term vision for achieving excellence in practice. She challenges existing best-practices by developing new systematic and design-based approaches applied and tested in complex, international projects that prioritise addressing climate change and people’s health & wellbeing. As a recognised expert in her field, Mina has been elected to, and is actively involved in the UKGBC’s Board of Trustees, RIBA’s Ethics & Sustainable Development Leadership Group, UNEP/GlobalABC’s COP26 Task Force, the Architects’ Council of Europe Sustainability Group, and the CIBSE Intelligent Buildings Group, as Vice Chair. Mina regularly contributes to the wider climate change, sustainability, and wellbeing debate in her role as tutor at various academic institutions and as a regularly invited speaker at many international events and symposiums.

Yasmeen Lari

Yasmeen Lari is Pakistan’s first female architect and Chair of INTBAU Pakistan. She is best known for her involvement in the intersection of architecture and social justice. Since her official retirement from architectural practice in 2000, her UN-recognized NGO Heritage Foundation Pakistan has been taking on humanitarian relief work and historical conservation projects in rural villages all around Pakistan. She was awarded with the prestigious Fukuoka Prize in 2016 and the Jane Drew prize in 2020.

 


 

Session 2:  Vernacular, Traditional, Local, Indigenous

Date: Friday 27 August

Time: 15:00 BST

This session will demonstrate the extraordinary diversity of the world’s building cultures, and the role the knowledge held within them must play in a sustainable built future.

Register now

 


 

Sessions from September to March:

3.  Difficult Questions

4.  Design Process and Case Studies

5.  Material Matters

6.  Homes, Shelters, Houses, Housing

7.  The Urban and the Rural

 


A-stone

Programme

The Challenge will launch with an online programme of webinars, interviews, Q&A sessions, and spotlighted case studies from around the world.

Sessions in the online programme will be held live each month from July until April, and will be free and open to everyone. Certificates will be awarded to those who take part in at least four sessions in the online programme.

Session 1 (Launch): Architecture’s Responsibility and Opportunity

Date: Friday 30 July

Time: 15:00 BST

This session will set the scene, demonstrating the scope of the challenge considering up to 40% of global carbon emissions are directly and indirectly influenced by built environment sectors and the opportunity this represents for those designing and building to be part of the solution to the climate crisis – providing better homes, shelters, houses, and housing in the process.

Register for the launch ⇒

Speakers:

Elsie Owusu

Elsie Owusu OBE is a leading British architect based in London. She was the first chair of the Society of Black Architects and has been a council member of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) since 2014. Her extensive portfolio includes co-leading the refurbishment of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom in 2009 and Green Park tube station. Having campaigned for equality and inclusion in architecture for many years, Owusu set up Architecture: Incubator initiative, to boost the numbers of diversity practices in the profession.

Eric J. Cesal

Eric J. Cesal is a designer, educator, writer, and noted post-disaster expert, having led on-the-ground reconstruction programs after the Haiti earthquake, the Great East Japan Tsunami, and Superstorm Sandy. Cesal’s formal training is as an architect, with international development, economics and foreign policy among his areas of expertise. Cesal serves as the Special Projects Director for the Curry Stone Foundation, a U.S. non-profit which seeks to support and empower community-driven social impact design and as host of Social Design Insights, a podcast with the leading voices of the public interest design movement. He also serves as the Director of Sustainable Environmental Design at the College of Design at UC Berkeley.

Mina Hasman

Mina Hasman leads Skidmore Owings and Merrill LLP’s sustainability and wellbeing daily operations and long-term vision for achieving excellence in practice. She challenges existing best-practices by developing new systematic and design-based approaches applied and tested in complex, international projects that prioritise addressing climate change and people’s health & wellbeing. As a recognised expert in her field, Mina has been elected to, and is actively involved in the UKGBC’s Board of Trustees, RIBA’s Ethics & Sustainable Development Leadership Group, UNEP/GlobalABC’s COP26 Task Force, the Architects’ Council of Europe Sustainability Group, and the CIBSE Intelligent Buildings Group, as Vice Chair. Mina regularly contributes to the wider climate change, sustainability, and wellbeing debate in her role as tutor at various academic institutions and as a regularly invited speaker at many international events and symposiums.

Yasmeen Lari

Yasmeen Lari is Pakistan’s first female architect and Chair of INTBAU Pakistan. She is best known for her involvement in the intersection of architecture and social justice. Since her official retirement from architectural practice in 2000, her UN-recognized NGO Heritage Foundation Pakistan has been taking on humanitarian relief work and historical conservation projects in rural villages all around Pakistan. She was awarded with the prestigious Fukuoka Prize in 2016 and the Jane Drew prize in 2020.

 


 

Session 2:  Vernacular, Traditional, Local, Indigenous

Date: Friday 27 August

Time: 15:00 BST

This session will demonstrate the extraordinary diversity of the world’s building cultures, and the role the knowledge held within them must play in a sustainable built future.

Register now

 


 

Sessions from September to March:

3.  Difficult Questions

4.  Design Process and Case Studies

5.  Material Matters

6.  Homes, Shelters, Houses, Housing

7.  The Urban and the Rural

 


A-bamboo

Design Competition

The Architecture Challenge design competition will open in October 2021, with a submission deadline in May 2022.

Proposals must advance local traditions, be low-cost and easy to build, and respond to a real location anywhere in the world that is affected by one or more of

lack of houses that are affordable, sustainable, and appropriate for their context

climate that needs more, new, better, or different design solutions

rapid change through population growth or decline

Participants in the design competition will be encouraged to work in multi-disciplinary teams. The online learning series will also provide opportunities for networking.

Design submissions will include an application form downloaded from the Architecture Challenge website, which will require:

    • a context statement which describes the location, its built and/or climactic challenges, and its building traditions, and which outlines plans for engagement with the local community/ies
    • a methods and materials statement which describes any advancing, adapting, or updating of the local vernacular to meet 21st century needs
    • a breakdown of anticipated costs per unit in GBP and/or local currency with, where possible, a local m2 comparable cost indicator
    • where possible, tested, proven, or anticipated performance results based on an accepted standard
    • a statement confirming the authors’ permission will be given for the design to be open source, shareable, downloadable, and scalable
    • a selection of high-resolution photographs, plans, drawings, and renderings

A first prize of £2,000 will be awarded to the winning entry, with two secondary prizes of £1,000 each.

An international jury will select the shortlist and winning entry.

A-bamboo

Design Competition

The Architecture Challenge design competition will open in October 2021, with a submission deadline in May 2022.

Proposals must advance local traditions, be low-cost and easy to build, and respond to a real location anywhere in the world that is affected by one or more of

lack of houses that are affordable, sustainable, and appropriate for their context

climate that needs more, new, better, or different design solutions

rapid change through population growth or decline

Participants in the design competition will be encouraged to work in multi-disciplinary teams. The online learning series will also provide opportunities for networking.

Design submissions will include an application form downloaded from the Architecture Challenge website, which will require:

    • a context statement which describes the location, its built and/or climactic challenges, and its building traditions, and which outlines plans for engagement with the local community/ies
    • a methods and materials statement which describes any advancing, adapting, or updating of the local vernacular to meet 21st century needs
    • a breakdown of anticipated costs per unit in GBP and/or local currency with, where possible, a local m2 comparable cost indicator
    • where possible, tested, proven, or anticipated performance results based on an accepted standard
    • a statement confirming the authors’ permission will be given for the design to be open source, shareable, downloadable, and scalable
    • a selection of high-resolution photographs, plans, drawings, and renderings

A first prize of £2,000 will be awarded to the winning entry, with two secondary prizes of £1,000 each.

An international jury will select the shortlist and winning entry.

Resources

Net Zero Carbon Guide

Climate Framework Resource Library

Healthy Materials Lab 

Prefabricated wooden housing at the Finnish Pavilion at this year’s Venice Biennale.

Where are the architects who will put the environment first?

“Define what is a natural material” What about mycelium?

Yasmeen Lari: architects can no longer serve the 1%

Hemp Concrete: From Roman Bridges to a Possible Material of the Future

RIBA Stirling Prize 2019: Cork House

Health and Urbanisation: What Makes a Healthy city?

Cob: what can we learn from this traditional building material?

Laterite: low-impact, affordable and beautiful

Curry Stone Foundation