A-rubber

About

The construction industry is a major contributor to global carbon emissions, meaning the potential for positive impact within the sector is equally great.

According to UN-Habitat and World Bank figures, by 2030 three billion people will need new housing and basic infrastructure.  Alongside the huge demand for construction this represents, we are at a point of unprecedented awareness of the depletion of resources used for building, and of the impact the built environment has on the health of people, communities, and the planet.

Now is our chance to take decisive action, by developing patterns of designing and building to improve quality of life for people around the world, and by learning from and advancing the local knowledge and traditional methods that have been adapted to climate and context over generations.

To find out more about INTBAU you can visit our website.  You can also register to be part of the Architecture Challenge, and to be sent more details about our interactive online programme.

A-rubber

About

The construction industry is a major contributor to global carbon emissions, meaning the potential for positive impact within the sector is equally great.

According to UN-Habitat and World Bank figures, by 2030 three billion people will need new housing and basic infrastructure. Alongside the huge demand for construction this represents, we are at a point of unprecedented awareness of the depletion of resources used for building, and of the impact the built environment has on the health of people, communities, and the planet.

Now is our chance to take decisive action, by developing patterns of designing and building to improve quality of life for people around the world, and by learning from and advancing the local knowledge and traditional methods that have been adapted to climate and context over generations.

To find out more about INTBAU you can visit our website. You can also register to be part of the Architecture Challenge, and to be sent more details about our interactive online programme.

A-earth

The Challenge

INTBAU is organising the Architecture Challenge as a competition for low-carbon, no-carbon, and carbon-negative designs for resilient and adaptable houses.

We want students, teachers, architects, designers, engineers, and anyone with an interest in buildings and building to take on The Challenge by registering below. You can get involved by joining the interactive online learning series, and by taking part in the design competition.

The learning series is free and open to everyone and will begin on 30 July with a webinar on architecture’s responsibility and opportunity better to serve people and the planet.

Full details of the learning series are in the Programme.

A-earth

The Challenge

INTBAU is organising the Architecture Challenge as a competition for low-carbon, no-carbon, and carbon-negative designs for resilient and adaptable houses.

We want students, teachers, architects, designers, engineers, and anyone with an interest in buildings and building to take on The Challenge by registering. You can get involved by joining the interactive online learning series, and by taking part in the design competition.

The learning series is free and open to everyone and will begin on 30 July with a webinar on architecture’s responsibility and opportunity better to serve people and the planet.

Full details of the learning series are in the Programme.

A-stone

Programme

The Challenge will launch with an online programme of webinars, interviews, Q&A sessions, and spotlighted case studies from around the world.

Sessions in the online programme will be held live each month from July until April, and will be free and open to everyone. Certificates will be awarded to those who take part in at least four sessions in the online programme.

Session 4: Material Matters

Thursday 28th October 15:00 GMT+1

For the fourth session in INTBAU’s Architecture Challenge programme, we will hear from four experts about why ‘Material Matters’. Our panel will examine four natural (and ‘natural’) building materials, outlining the materials’ potential uses and abuses as well as their aesthetic and health impacts, and responding to some of the difficult questions surrounding the future of supply chains and provenance.

Register here

 


 

Sessions from November to March:

5.  Design Process and Case Studies

6.  Homes, Shelters, Houses, Housing

7.  The Urban and the Rural

 


 

Past Sessions

Session 1 (Launch): Architecture’s Responsibility and Opportunity

This session sets the scene, demonstrating the scope of the challenge considering up to 40% of global carbon emissions are directly and indirectly influenced by built environment sectors and the opportunity this represents for those designing and building to be part of the solution to the climate crisis – providing better homes, shelters, houses, and housing in the process.

View the session recording

Speakers:

Elsie Owusu

Elsie Owusu OBE is a leading British architect based in London. She was the first chair of the Society of Black Architects and has been a council member of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) since 2014. Her extensive portfolio includes co-leading the refurbishment of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom in 2009 and Green Park tube station. Having campaigned for equality and inclusion in architecture for many years, Owusu set up Architecture: Incubator initiative, to boost the numbers of diversity practices in the profession.

Eric J. Cesal

Eric J. Cesal is a designer, educator, writer, and noted post-disaster expert, having led on-the-ground reconstruction programs after the Haiti earthquake, the Great East Japan Tsunami, and Superstorm Sandy. Cesal’s formal training is as an architect, with international development, economics and foreign policy among his areas of expertise. Cesal serves as the Special Projects Director for the Curry Stone Foundation, a U.S. non-profit which seeks to support and empower community-driven social impact design and as host of Social Design Insights, a podcast with the leading voices of the public interest design movement. He also serves as the Director of Sustainable Environmental Design at the College of Design at UC Berkeley.

Mina Hasman

Mina Hasman leads Skidmore Owings and Merrill LLP’s sustainability and wellbeing daily operations and long-term vision for achieving excellence in practice. She challenges existing best-practices by developing new systematic and design-based approaches applied and tested in complex, international projects that prioritise addressing climate change and people’s health & wellbeing. As a recognised expert in her field, Mina has been elected to, and is actively involved in the UKGBC’s Board of Trustees, RIBA’s Ethics & Sustainable Development Leadership Group, UNEP/GlobalABC’s COP26 Task Force, the Architects’ Council of Europe Sustainability Group, and the CIBSE Intelligent Buildings Group, as Vice Chair. Mina regularly contributes to the wider climate change, sustainability, and wellbeing debate in her role as tutor at various academic institutions and as a regularly invited speaker at many international events and symposiums.

Yasmeen Lari

Yasmeen Lari is Pakistan’s first female architect and Chair of INTBAU Pakistan. She is best known for her involvement in the intersection of architecture and social justice. Since her official retirement from architectural practice in 2000, her UN-recognized NGO Heritage Foundation Pakistan has been taking on humanitarian relief work and historical conservation projects in rural villages all around Pakistan. She was awarded with the prestigious Fukuoka Prize in 2016 and the Jane Drew prize in 2020.

Session 2:  Vernacular, Traditional, Local, Indigenous

For millennia, our planet has played host to many hundreds of methods of building structures for people to live and meet in and around. These methods have been adapted over generations, developing from local factors such as skills, materials, and climates.  

In 2021, there is increasing recognition of the wisdom and relevance embodied in vernacular, traditional, local, and indigenous methods of building, which work with nature rather than against it. This session will demonstrate (a small fraction of) the extraordinary diversity of the world’s building cultures, and the role the knowledge held within them must play in a sustainable built future.   

View the session recording 

Speakers

Manalee Nanavati

Manalee is an architect, an alumnus of CEPT Uni. and Oxford Brookes Uni., Oxford, UK. She has a particular interest in architectural regeneration and development. Her work in practice, research, and academia focuses on exploring architecture as a tool for the holistic development of an area/ region and its community. To date, her research has focussed on India, Algeria, Portugal, Pakistan and Nepal. Her achievements include various academic and research scholarships as well as awards including GICEA Gold Medal. She is currently working on a research project at IIT Bombay.

Ellen Buttrose

Ellen is a registered architect in Queensland and Victoria, currently working for People Orientated Design (POD) architects. Ellen sits on the Sustainability Committee for the Queensland chapter of the Australian Institute of Architects and in 2020 received the Emerging Architect Prize (Qld State Award). She has experience in community engagement from her time working at the Office for Design + Architecture SA (ODASA), where she worked on major public projects and on a community based advocacy project, “Project Tag”. Ellen also previously worked for Melbourne based architectural practice Six Degrees, working on institutional, cultural and civic projects that focussed on public interface and human centred experience. Ellen has worked collaboratively with clients across university and government sectors, and at local and state levels.

Professor Marcel Vellinga

Marcel Vellinga is Professor of Anthropology of Architecture at Oxford Brookes University in the United Kingdom. Holding a PhD in Cultural Anthropology from Leiden University in the Netherlands, Marcel has taught and published on a variety of topics including vernacular architecture, the anthropology of architecture, rural architectural regeneration, and tradition and sustainable development. Marcel is the Editor-in-Chief of the second edition of the Encyclopedia of Vernacular Architecture of the World, to be published by Bloomsbury Publishing in 2022.

Ángela Calvo García

Ángela Calvo García graduated in Architecture from the Polytechnic University of Madrid School of Architecture. She has long been interested in traditions, concerning dance, music, crafts and finally architecture; understanding Vernacular Architecture as another expression of a place and its people. Her work verses from ephemeral architecture to traditional construction techniques. She has been a member of the team of the National Directory of Traditional Building Masters in Spain and nowadays works with Terrachidia.

Recent Philippe Rotthier Award winner, Terrichidia, is an NGO promoting traditional earth building and architecture in the M’Hamid Oasis in southern Morocco. Terrachidia have worked to restore and rebuild 17 key buildings and public spaces in the oasis and hosted workshops where locals and international visitors alike have been trained in traditional building techniques.

Session 3: Difficult Questions

The third webinar in the Architecture Challenge programme focusses on unpicking some of the difficult questions that come hand-in-hand with any discussion of the future sustainability of the built environment. This session will feature four speakers answering tough questions and giving their thoughts and perspectives on issues such as what ‘better building’ should mean, what it could look like, and what currently makes it complicated or impossible in many contexts around the world.

Supply chains, the definition of a ‘natural’ material, carbon calculators, and construction standards will all be on the agenda. We will also look at questions relating to responsibility, and who holds it. Where should we start making changes? Can time-tested, zero-carbon, local design solutions be adapted internationally and at scale? How can building regulations accommodate flexible approaches that put people and planet at the forefront of the design process?

View the session recording 

Speakers:

Andrew Coates

Andrew Coates is the founder of Cresolus Panama, a team of architects, engineers and craftspeople who specialise in designing buildings and infrastructure for hot and humid climates. Through their work around the tropical world, they have collected thousands of examples of good tropical design techniques that were found in vernacular and colonial architecture from the Caribbean, Central Africa and across to Indonesia and put them to work in their designs.

Dr Hans Friederich

Dr Hans Friederich FRGS is a Dutch geographer with a PhD from the University of Bristol, UK currently living in Gozo, Malta. Hans is a Member of the China Council for International Cooperation on Environment and Development, a global Ambassador of the World Bamboo Organisation and Senior Advisor to the European Bamboo Programme which is managed by Bamboologic in the Netherlands.

From 2014 to 2019, Hans was the Director-General of the International Bamboo and Rattan Organisation (INBAR), acting as an observer to the UN General Assembly in Beijing. Prior to this role, Hans was Regional Director in Europe for the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Earlier in his career worked in Botswana, Kenya, Thailand and in Vietnam, where in 1999 he was awarded the Medal for Science and Technology in recognition of his work for the National Environment Agency.

Rebecca Reubens 

Dr. Rebecca Reubens began her journey in sustainability, while studying industrial design at the National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad. Her PhD research at Delft University of Technology was at the intersection of craft, design and sustainability. She continues her professional practice in this domain through her sustainable design studio called Rhizome. She has worked extensively in the development sector, mainly in Asia, Africa and Europe. Most of her work centers around connecting craft-based MSMEs to larger markets by linking them to sustainability-aligned markets. Bamboo remains her expertise and material of choice.

Rebecca remains linked to academia as a visiting design educator across design schools in India. She is the author of several publications including a book on bamboo for the Prins Claus Fonds, and most recently a book on mainstreaming sustainability in craft MSMEs through design for Routledge. She is also a World Bamboo Ambassador for the World Bamboo Organization.

Jane Anderson

Jane is an expert in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and Environmental Product Declarations (EPD) for the construction sector, having worked in this field for over 20 years. Jane is the UK expert on CEN/TC350/WG3, which developed EN 15804:2013, the European Standard for EPD for construction products, and ISO/TC59/SC17/WG3 which developed ISO 21930:2017. She worked at BRE from 1998-2010, co-authoring several editions of the Green Guide to Specification, the BRE Environmental Profiles Methodology and leading the development of the building LCA tool, Envest2, amongst other projects. Jane also runs her own consultancy, ConstructionLCA Ltd, specialising in EPD Verification, PCR development, and guidance and advice around LCA and EPD in construction.

A-stone

Programme

The Challenge will launch with an online programme of webinars, interviews, Q&A sessions, and spotlighted case studies from around the world.

Sessions in the online programme will be held live each month from July until April, and will be free and open to everyone. Certificates will be awarded to those who take part in at least four sessions in the online programme.

Session 4: Material Matters

Thursday 28th October 15:00 GMT+1

For the fourth session in INTBAU’s Architecture Challenge programme, we will hear from four experts about why ‘Material Matters’. Our panel will examine four natural (and ‘natural’) building materials, outlining the materials’ potential uses and abuses as well as their aesthetic and health impacts, and responding to some of the difficult questions surrounding the future of supply chains and provenance.

Register here

 


 

Sessions from November to March:

5.  Design Process and Case Studies

6.  Homes, Shelters, Houses, Housing

7.  The Urban and the Rural

 


 

Past Sessions

Session 1 (Launch): Architecture’s Responsibility and Opportunity

This session sets the scene, demonstrating the scope of the challenge considering up to 40% of global carbon emissions are directly and indirectly influenced by built environment sectors and the opportunity this represents for those designing and building to be part of the solution to the climate crisis – providing better homes, shelters, houses, and housing in the process.

View the session recording

Speakers:

Elsie Owusu

Elsie Owusu OBE is a leading British architect based in London. She was the first chair of the Society of Black Architects and has been a council member of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) since 2014. Her extensive portfolio includes co-leading the refurbishment of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom in 2009 and Green Park tube station. Having campaigned for equality and inclusion in architecture for many years, Owusu set up Architecture: Incubator initiative, to boost the numbers of diversity practices in the profession.

Eric J. Cesal

Eric J. Cesal is a designer, educator, writer, and noted post-disaster expert, having led on-the-ground reconstruction programs after the Haiti earthquake, the Great East Japan Tsunami, and Superstorm Sandy. Cesal’s formal training is as an architect, with international development, economics and foreign policy among his areas of expertise. Cesal serves as the Special Projects Director for the Curry Stone Foundation, a U.S. non-profit which seeks to support and empower community-driven social impact design and as host of Social Design Insights, a podcast with the leading voices of the public interest design movement. He also serves as the Director of Sustainable Environmental Design at the College of Design at UC Berkeley.

Mina Hasman

Mina Hasman leads Skidmore Owings and Merrill LLP’s sustainability and wellbeing daily operations and long-term vision for achieving excellence in practice. She challenges existing best-practices by developing new systematic and design-based approaches applied and tested in complex, international projects that prioritise addressing climate change and people’s health & wellbeing. As a recognised expert in her field, Mina has been elected to, and is actively involved in the UKGBC’s Board of Trustees, RIBA’s Ethics & Sustainable Development Leadership Group, UNEP/GlobalABC’s COP26 Task Force, the Architects’ Council of Europe Sustainability Group, and the CIBSE Intelligent Buildings Group, as Vice Chair. Mina regularly contributes to the wider climate change, sustainability, and wellbeing debate in her role as tutor at various academic institutions and as a regularly invited speaker at many international events and symposiums.

Yasmeen Lari

Yasmeen Lari is Pakistan’s first female architect and Chair of INTBAU Pakistan. She is best known for her involvement in the intersection of architecture and social justice. Since her official retirement from architectural practice in 2000, her UN-recognized NGO Heritage Foundation Pakistan has been taking on humanitarian relief work and historical conservation projects in rural villages all around Pakistan. She was awarded with the prestigious Fukuoka Prize in 2016 and the Jane Drew prize in 2020.

Session 2: Vernacular, Traditional, Local, Indigenous

This session will demonstrate the extraordinary diversity of the world’s building cultures, and the role the knowledge held within them must play in a sustainable built future.

View the session recording 

Speakers

Manalee Nanavati

Manalee is an architect, an alumnus of CEPT Uni. and Oxford Brookes Uni., Oxford, UK. She has a particular interest in architectural regeneration and development. Her work in practice, research, and academia focuses on exploring architecture as a tool for the holistic development of an area/ region and its community. To date, her research has focussed on India, Algeria, Portugal, Pakistan and Nepal. Her achievements include various academic and research scholarships as well as awards including GICEA Gold Medal. She is currently working on a research project at IIT Bombay.

Ellen Buttrose

Ellen is a registered architect in Queensland and Victoria, currently working for People Orientated Design (POD) architects. Ellen sits on the Sustainability Committee for the Queensland chapter of the Australian Institute of Architects and in 2020 received the Emerging Architect Prize (Qld State Award). She has experience in community engagement from her time working at the Office for Design + Architecture SA (ODASA), where she worked on major public projects and on a community based advocacy project, “Project Tag”. Ellen also previously worked for Melbourne based architectural practice Six Degrees, working on institutional, cultural and civic projects that focussed on public interface and human centred experience. Ellen has worked collaboratively with clients across university and government sectors, and at local and state levels.

Professor Marcel Vellinga

Marcel Vellinga is Professor of Anthropology of Architecture at Oxford Brookes University in the United Kingdom. Holding a PhD in Cultural Anthropology from Leiden University in the Netherlands, Marcel has taught and published on a variety of topics including vernacular architecture, the anthropology of architecture, rural architectural regeneration, and tradition and sustainable development. Marcel is the Editor-in-Chief of the second edition of the Encyclopedia of Vernacular Architecture of the World, to be published by Bloomsbury Publishing in 2022.

Ángela Calvo García

Ángela Calvo García graduated in Architecture from the Polytechnic University of Madrid School of Architecture. She has long been interested in traditions, concerning dance, music, crafts and finally architecture; understanding Vernacular Architecture as another expression of a place and its people. Her work verses from ephemeral architecture to traditional construction techniques. She has been a member of the team of the National Directory of Traditional Building Masters in Spain and nowadays works with Terrachidia.

Recent Philippe Rotthier Award winner, Terrichidia, is an NGO promoting traditional earth building and architecture in the M’Hamid Oasis in southern Morocco. Terrachidia have worked to restore and rebuild 17 key buildings and public spaces in the oasis and hosted workshops where locals and international visitors alike have been trained in traditional building techniques.

Session 3: Difficult Questions

The third webinar in the Architecture Challenge programme focusses on unpicking some of the difficult questions that come hand-in-hand with any discussion of the future sustainability of the built environment. This session will feature four speakers answering tough questions and giving their thoughts and perspectives on issues such as what ‘better building’ should mean, what it could look like, and what currently makes it complicated or impossible in many contexts around the world.

View the session recording 

Speakers:

Andrew Coates

Andrew Coates is the founder of Cresolus Panama, a team of architects, engineers and craftspeople who specialise in designing buildings and infrastructure for hot and humid climates. Through their work around the tropical world, they have collected thousands of examples of good tropical design techniques that were found in vernacular and colonial architecture from the Caribbean, Central Africa and across to Indonesia and put them to work in their designs.

Dr Hans Friederich

Dr Hans Friederich FRGS is a Dutch geographer with a PhD from the University of Bristol, UK currently living in Gozo, Malta. Hans is a Member of the China Council for International Cooperation on Environment and Development, a global Ambassador of the World Bamboo Organisation and Senior Advisor to the European Bamboo Programme which is managed by Bamboologic in the Netherlands.

From 2014 to 2019, Hans was the Director-General of the International Bamboo and Rattan Organisation (INBAR), acting as an observer to the UN General Assembly in Beijing. Prior to this role, Hans was Regional Director in Europe for the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Earlier in his career worked in Botswana, Kenya, Thailand and in Vietnam, where in 1999 he was awarded the Medal for Science and Technology in recognition of his work for the National Environment Agency.

Rebecca Reubens 

Dr. Rebecca Reubens began her journey in sustainability, while studying industrial design at the National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad. Her PhD research at Delft University of Technology was at the intersection of craft, design and sustainability. She continues her professional practice in this domain through her sustainable design studio called Rhizome. She has worked extensively in the development sector, mainly in Asia, Africa and Europe. Most of her work centers around connecting craft-based MSMEs to larger markets by linking them to sustainability-aligned markets. Bamboo remains her expertise and material of choice.

Rebecca remains linked to academia as a visiting design educator across design schools in India. She is the author of several publications including a book on bamboo for the Prins Claus Fonds, and most recently a book on mainstreaming sustainability in craft MSMEs through design for Routledge. She is also a World Bamboo Ambassador for the World Bamboo Organization.

Jane Anderson

Jane is an expert in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and Environmental Product Declarations (EPD) for the construction sector, having worked in this field for over 20 years. Jane is the UK expert on CEN/TC350/WG3, which developed EN 15804:2013, the European Standard for EPD for construction products, and ISO/TC59/SC17/WG3 which developed ISO 21930:2017. She worked at BRE from 1998-2010, co-authoring several editions of the Green Guide to Specification, the BRE Environmental Profiles Methodology and leading the development of the building LCA tool, Envest2, amongst other projects. Jane also runs her own consultancy, ConstructionLCA Ltd, specialising in EPD Verification, PCR development, and guidance and advice around LCA and EPD in construction.

A-bamboo

Design Competition

The Architecture Challenge design competition will open in October 2021, with a submission deadline in May 2022.

Proposals must advance local traditions, be low-cost and easy to build, and respond to a real location anywhere in the world that is affected by one or more of

lack of houses that are affordable, sustainable, and appropriate for their context

climate that needs more, new, better, or different design solutions

rapid change through population growth or decline

Participants in the design competition will be encouraged to work in multi-disciplinary teams. The online learning series will also provide opportunities for networking.

Design submissions will include an application form downloaded from the Architecture Challenge website, which will require:

    • a context statement which describes the location, its built and/or climactic challenges, and its building traditions, and which outlines plans for engagement with the local community/ies
    • a methods and materials statement which describes any advancing, adapting, or updating of the local vernacular to meet 21st century needs
    • a breakdown of anticipated costs per unit in GBP and/or local currency with, where possible, a local m2 comparable cost indicator
    • where possible, tested, proven, or anticipated performance results based on an accepted standard
    • a statement confirming the authors’ permission will be given for the design to be open source, shareable, downloadable, and scalable
    • a selection of high-resolution photographs, plans, drawings, and renderings

A first prize of £2,000 will be awarded to the winning entry, with two secondary prizes of £1,000 each.

An international jury will select the shortlist and winning entry.

A-bamboo

Design Competition

The Architecture Challenge design competition will open in October 2021, with a submission deadline in May 2022.

Proposals must advance local traditions, be low-cost and easy to build, and respond to a real location anywhere in the world that is affected by one or more of

lack of houses that are affordable, sustainable, and appropriate for their context

climate that needs more, new, better, or different design solutions

rapid change through population growth or decline

Participants in the design competition will be encouraged to work in multi-disciplinary teams. The online learning series will also provide opportunities for networking.

Design submissions will include an application form downloaded from the Architecture Challenge website, which will require:

    • a context statement which describes the location, its built and/or climactic challenges, and its building traditions, and which outlines plans for engagement with the local community/ies
    • a methods and materials statement which describes any advancing, adapting, or updating of the local vernacular to meet 21st century needs
    • a breakdown of anticipated costs per unit in GBP and/or local currency with, where possible, a local m2 comparable cost indicator
    • where possible, tested, proven, or anticipated performance results based on an accepted standard
    • a statement confirming the authors’ permission will be given for the design to be open source, shareable, downloadable, and scalable
    • a selection of high-resolution photographs, plans, drawings, and renderings

A first prize of £2,000 will be awarded to the winning entry, with two secondary prizes of £1,000 each.

An international jury will select the shortlist and winning entry.

Resources

Net Zero Carbon Guide

Climate Framework Resource Library

Healthy Materials Lab 

Prefabricated wooden housing at the Finnish Pavilion at this year’s Venice Biennale.

Where are the architects who will put the environment first?

“Define what is a natural material” What about mycelium?

Yasmeen Lari: architects can no longer serve the 1%

Hemp Concrete: From Roman Bridges to a Possible Material of the Future

RIBA Stirling Prize 2019: Cork House

Health and Urbanisation: What Makes a Healthy city?

Cob: what can we learn from this traditional building material?

Laterite: low-impact, affordable and beautiful

Curry Stone Foundation

Ellen MacArthur Foundation